Ankle Mobility and Achilles Tendon Injury

The achilles tendon is a strong, durable structure capable of absorbing and producing large loads as we walk, hike, and run.  When the tendon is overloaded without adequate recovery periods this structure is prone to painful and limiting conditions such as achilles tendonitis and tendinopathy.  One of the important risk factors for achilles injury among athletes and patients is a lack of ankle mobility.  If the ankle is unable to bend adequately during functional movements the achilles is placed under increased load leading to tendon injury.  In our Boulder Physical Therapy practice, we commonly see a loss of ankle mobility among patients with achilles tendon injury.

During our Physical Therapy examination we often see a loss of rear foot or ankle mobility and a compensatory increase in motion at the mid foot or arch (pronation).  A recent study in the journal Clinical Biomechanics confirmed our observations (Chimenti, R. et al. 2016).  The authors assessed individuals with and without achilles tendinopathy to determine their ability to bend their ankle as well as which areas of the ankle and foot where contributing to this movement.  The group with achilles tendinopathy had significantly less ankle mobility than the control group.  Importantly, this group compensated during testing with increased mobility of their arch instead due to an inability to move through the rearfoot.

This study highlights the importance of treating the ankle in patients with achilles tendon injury.  To learn more about how to safely and effectively treat this condition contact your local PT.