Should I Stretch My Pectoral Muscles To Relieve My Shoulder Pain?

shoulder-pain-posture-stretching-pectorals

Our current understanding of posture has changed dramatically over the past 20 years due to the influx of scientific literature on posture and muscle and joint pain. Previously, posture was thought to be strongly associated with muscles imbalances including tightness or weakness. For example, forward shoulders were thought to be associated with shortened pectoral muscles. Our current understanding has reduced the importance of posture on both clinical decision making and an association with a patient’s current symptoms. Patient’s with poor posture can demonstrate normal muscle function and those with great posture can demonstrate significant muscle imbalances and pain. A recent research paper highlights these concepts on patient’s with shoulder pain.

Navarro-Ledesma and colleagues examined the muscle length and available joint space in patients with shoulder pain compared to their pain free peers (PT in Sport. 2018). Each participant’s pectoral minor length and shoulder joint (subacromial) space was measured clinically with ultrasound. The authors reported pectoral muscle length was poorly associated with both shoulder joint space and the presence of shoulder pain. These findings are consistent with our currently held belief on the limited importance of pectoral muscle length or flexibility and the presence or development of shoulder pain. Patient’s are encouraged to work with a local Physical Therapist on a shoulder and shoulder blade strengthening program instead of stretching their pectoral or chest muscles.

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